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Markets in History

Historical Perspectives on Markets and the Economy

 

 

 articles 1-10 / 96   page 1 of 10 »  
 
American Default
The Untold Story of FDR, the Supreme Court, and the Battle over Gold
Princeton University Press, May 2018 , Sebastian Edwards

The Count of Monte Cristo
The Count of Monte Cristo has numerous financial data and speculations in it that shows that during the Napoleonic years there was active speculations.
Daily Speculations, September 16, 2018 , Victor Niederhoffer

General Electric: The Fallen Giant
"General Electric’s decline has been steady during the 21st century. In 2000, GE’s market cap was over $500 billion and as recently as 2005, General Electric was the largest company in the world. Since then, GE has lost over $400 billion in market cap, and today, GE doesn’t even make the top 50 in the world."
Global Financial Data, 22 June 2018 , Dr. Brian Taylor

The Russian Stock Market Before the Revolution
"Russian stocks advanced more in price than American stocks between 1864 and 1914, but American companies paid larger dividends. Price and dividends offset each other and during that 45-year period, the two stock markets provided approximately equal returns."
Global Financial Data, 21 March 2018 , Dr. Brian Taylor

Market Capitalization Amazon vs. Sears
1999 vs. 2017
L2 Inc. December 2017 , Scott Galloway

Retail's Anti-Christ
Market Value Today vs. 2006
NYU, December 2017 , Scott Galloway

Why French Investors are Truly les Misérables
"Over a 100-year period, French investors would have lost over 90% of their money after inflation no matter how they invested their money."
Global Financial Data, 17 April 2017 , Dr. Brian Taylor

The First Billion-Dollar Company
It was only back in 1970 that the capitalization of the entire United States stock market hit $1 trillion and soon a single company may be worth that much. This raises the question, what was the first company to be worth $1 billion?
Global Financial Data, 15 November 2017 , Dr. Brian Taylor

Volatility (or Lack Thereof) Isn’t Predictive
"While it’s tempting to think danger lurks under still waters—and financial media provide prompts aplenty—calm periods don’t portend big price movements ahead. Nor do they herald further tranquility. Volatility—low or high; up or down—is incapable of foretelling the future."
Fisher Investments MarketMinder, November 16, 2017 , Editorial Staff

The Bank Bubble of 1929
"In reality, the bull market of the 1920s had more of an impact upon utility stocks and bank stocks than it did on industrial and railroad stocks."
Global Financial Data, June 3, 2017 , Dr. Brian Taylor