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Current Observations on Asset Classes

 

 

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Bloomberg: Prattle Analysis Shows Men Speak 92% of Time on Earnings Calls
Prattle, September 18, 2018

...on The Diversification Fata Morgana.
Excerpt
The Diversification Fata Morgana: Capital Account Openness and the Fall and Rise of Stock Market Correlations, 1890-2000 , 2015 , Dennis Quinn and Hans-joachim Voth

Shadow Risk in Passive Investing
Excerpt
Artemis Capital Management, October 2017 , Christopher Cole, Founder & CIO of Artemis Capital

The Oxymoron of World Trade
Oxymorons are powerful combinations of contradictory meanings. We encounter oxymorons in every human form of expression attempting a description of reality, whether it be in works of tragedy (“fearful bravery” in Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar), in our daily lives (work that is “almost done”), or even in the projected future of human societies (“artificial intelligence”).
Gavekal Intelligence Software, The Quant Corner, September 2018 , Didier Darcet

Asset Class Returns in Swiss Francs (2008 - 2017)
Hinder Asset Management, 2018 , Dr. Alex Hinder

Gold in Turkish Lira (TRY)
Chart of the Month
1875 CIO Office, Current Views, August 2018 , 1875 Finance

General Electric: The Fallen Giant
"General Electric’s decline has been steady during the 21st century. In 2000, GE’s market cap was over $500 billion and as recently as 2005, General Electric was the largest company in the world. Since then, GE has lost over $400 billion in market cap, and today, GE doesn’t even make the top 50 in the world."
Global Financial Data, 22 June 2018 , Dr. Brian Taylor

Neurosis Is Killing Your Returns!
Short-term volatility is the psychological price investors pay to achieve stocks’ high historical long-term returns.
Fisher Investments MarketMinder, 14/06/2018 , Michael Hanson

Memory Sticks!
Gavekal Intelligence Software, The Quant Corner, June 2018 , Didier Darcet

The Russian Stock Market Before the Revolution
"Russian stocks advanced more in price than American stocks between 1864 and 1914, but American companies paid larger dividends. Price and dividends offset each other and during that 45-year period, the two stock markets provided approximately equal returns."
Global Financial Data, 21 March 2018 , Dr. Brian Taylor